Monitoring - Blanchard River Watershed Partnership
Clean Water. Bright Future.

Recent News

The 2014 Annual Meeting will be held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at the Hancock Ag. Center on CR...
Work on installing a Wooded Riparian Buffer along Lye Creek on East Main Cross St. in Findlay has st...
The BRWP is supporting an effort by the Sierra Club to conduct a Volunteer Chemical Testing Monitori...
The Blanchard River Watershed Partnership has elected their officers for 2014. Elected President was...

Watershed Monitoring Data Available!

Statistics are now available for numerous sites within the watershed based on physical water surveys taken throughout the past year. Through data collection relating to the existence of numerous macroinvertebrate species and water conditions, site baselines have been established. Actual changes in the health of the water can now be tracked and evaluated in the future. Contact Phil Martin at 419-422-6487 for specific data on each site.

Summary 2008
No Data for 2009
Summary 2010
Summary 2011
Summary 2012
Summary 2013

Water Quality Monitoring Started By Blanchard River Watershed Partnership

Wet and muddy volunteers will soon be seen along riverbanks as water quality monitoring starts this season in the headwaters of the Blanchard River. Grants from The Community Foundation, Environmental Defense Fund, and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to the Blanchard River Watershed Partnership (BRWP) are funding the project, started in 2008. Information is being gathered to assist in protecting water supplies to public water systems and wells throughout the six county watershed. All volunteers have permission from landowners or will work from bridges.

Watershed Coordinator Phil Martin will lead volunteer training and river monitoring work assisted by Sarah Betts, Natural Resources Coordinator for the Hancock Park District. Research will be continued in the Outlet / Lye Creek sub-watersheds up river from Findlay and, new this year will be Riley Creek near Bluffton. The BRWP work is an economical way to determine local solutions and get the public involved.

Volunteers for the monitoring and observation of river problems are still needed and may contact Martin to get involved at 419-422-6487. New recruits will be trained to gather samples of animal life affected by pollution which help in finding solutions for watershed restoration. Problems with failed septic systems, erosion and contaminants leaking into the river may be probable sources. Grants may be available to landowners to assist in such remedial projects once a water quality management plan is completed.